The Principal's Principles

A Middle School Principal, striving to make the world a better place, one day at a time.

She’s the best daughter I have

This year, my message to our staff at our opening meeting came from a very personal place. Last week, a major milestone happened in our household; young Averie Bernia started a preschool program for three year olds and it was her first day. 

I’ve  been a member of our profession for 12 years. I’ve walked new 6th grade parents to the door as they dropped their child off, providing countless statements of reassurance. I’ve said, genuinely, “we will take care of him/her” hundreds of times, and meant it every time. 

It’s just different when it is your child.

As we walked across the parking lot, self doubt began to creep in. Have I read to her enough? Are her skills where they need to be? Is the school going to ask for something we haven’t provided? Have we as parents done all that we should to prepare her for today?

For the record, she did fine. And for the record, I still worry whether or not I have done enough to make sure she is prepared. Parents more veteran than I that I’ve  spoken with this week have said that doesn’t go away.  

“Parents send us the best children we have, and they expect us to take care of them and ensure that they grow.”

I’ve made the statement before, but last week, as I walked my own child in to school for the first time, I really felt how true these words are.

“Parents want us to have good working conditions so we stay in our roles over time, they just ask that we advocate for ourselves when their children aren’t here to be educated.”

I’ve made this statement before, but last week, as I walked my own child in to school for the first time, I really felt how true these words are.

“Parents depend on us to be experts, to be on the front lines of what is new, and to do whatever it takes to make their child succeed.”

I’ve made this statement before, but last week, as I walked my own child into school for the first time, I really felt how true these words are.

As educators, we have a profound responsibility, one that I felt presonally for the first time this week. The students we will work with this year did not ask to be born and to be educated in a time when state policy and funding had gone beyond the point of absurdity. It is incumbent upon all of us to roll up our sleeves and get to work, to be the professionals we want to work with our own children.

Do work you’re proud of. Let’s have a great year.

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